The Next Graphene?

August 06, 2014 12:50 PM EST By: Jennifer Rocha

UC Riverside engineers awarded grant to study new class of ultra-thin film materials that could improve the performance of personal electronics, optoelectronic devices and energy conversion systems.

Story content courtesy of University of California-Riverside, US

Three University of California, Riverside engineers are part of team recently awarded a nearly $1.7 million grant from the National Science Foundation to characterize, analyze and synthesize a new class of ultra-thin film materials that could improve the performance of personal electronics, optoelectronic devices and energy conversion systems.

The research is expected to produce new material synthesis techniques and enable practical applications of ultra-thin film materials in electronic switches, optical detectors, low-power information processing and direct energy conversion. The novel devices implemented with the ultra-thin films of van der Waals materials have potential for high speed and low energy dissipation.  Each member of the NSF-funded team will cover different aspects of the research and application of the van der Walls materials.

The NSF funding to UC Riverside team was awarded via a competitive Emerging Frontiers in Research and Innovation (EFRI-2014) program called Two-Dimensional Atomic-layer Research and Engineering (2-DARE).


 

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